Tech Crunch – By @alexbottner_

Marc lewis | October 22, 2018

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By Alex Bottner

 

Tech Crunch

I cannot believe how many projects I’ve created in 6 weeks at SCA.

We’ve made silent films, posters, animated text, fonts and more. I’ve created more content in 6 weeks than I have in years!

When I was studying film in university, I used to hold back from taking on projects that I felt I wouldn’t be “the best” at or that required a software I had never used before. I was talking to a friend about this, and she mentioned something her brother told her:

“People need to remember that everyone is just winging it. Do you think the founders of the company you work for knew what they were doing when they started the company? Just because someone has as a job title as director doesn’t mean they know what they’re doing all of the time.”

It reminded me of one of our mentors. He had been working on a project for a client and they asked him if he could fix something minor in photoshop. He said yes even though he had never used it before and used YouTube tutorials to get the job done.

The industry standards for software will always keep changing. You can’t let that prevent you from finishing the overall project.

It was inspiring to hear how Ian Hands and Dave Birss have made so many different kinds of work in their careers and have fearlessly picked up new technologies to create them. Dave mentioned that he had graduated in computer science. The codes he learned in university don’t even exist anymore, but he applied the concepts of what he studied to learn new codes and build websites. Ian started in illustration, but has done everything from designing fonts to making 3D artwork and animation.

Listening to these stories has given me a reality check on the steep learning curve I’m experiencing with Adobe. It is frustrating when you have an idea in your head, but you have no idea how to even make the image a reality. What I have learned is that you will always come up with some solution to the problem when you have tight deadlines. There are so many ways that you can achieve what you want to create in these programs, and having these deadlines forces you to think fast.

If your message and strategy behind the image is strong, people will get it, even if the finer details are not flawless.

While I’m coming up with these fast solutions, I also have to remind myself that this course is a marathon, not a race. I can already start to see that the initial problems that I struggled with in Photoshop have started to become second nature to me. I just need to keep building on what I am learning, and I will get there.