Randomness from ‘The World Goes Pop’ at the Tate Modern. By @13samuels

The Dean bigadminjobs | January 20, 2016

Posted in Blog, Front, Keep

Sam Markham

By Sam Markham

 

Randomness from ‘The World Goes Pop’ at the Tate Modern.

Excerpts of titles of works of art and text from the description.
An inspiring exhibition on subverting the norm.

“This painting of a mouth sewn shut.
Images of consumer goods or the seductive visual language of advertising.
Atomic kiss.
Replacing the American flag’ s red white and stripes with a rainbow.
The new Jemima. At last , a silhouette slimmed to the waist.
… Suggests the idea that war is a game, in which players score points by striking various targets. Bombs in love. Crayon Angel. Sexualised images of human silhouettes are interspersed among fragmented images of warfare.
… Ominously orange, the color of firebombing in his memory. Keiichi Tanaami . Roaring American aeroplanes.
In ‘Guitarist’ , for example, he transposes the face of a friend onto the body of a rock musician, appropriating the iconic power of the publicity image .
… The relationship between the female body and society’s gaze. The title comes from a phrase for two way traffic, implying a parallel flow of opposing interpretations . Licensed in Both Ways .
It included a room with a couple in a bed, a dental surgery, a walk in freezer and a beauty salon housed in the shape of a woman’s head.
Turn waste gasoline into extra mileage . Where your driving takes a turn for the best. Merging parts of women’s torsos with kitchen appliances. This work originally invited the viewer into a space in which they would be surrounded by representations of different aspects of human intimacy.
Love Machine. Psycho furniture.
The works in this room focus on representations of the body as something experienced from within rather than perceived and evaluated from outside.
Little T V woman, ‘ I am the last woman object’
… Their genitals replaced with mirrors, sabotaging any attempted voyeurism. Jana Źelibská.
Maybe I better call Bob Hope and tell him about it.
Advertising always shows consumption as pleasurable.
Commercial War. “