The language barrier @marionaulas

Moving abroad is a big step. Maybe it’s not for some people who are used to it, but to me, it is.
It’s not about living away from my friends and family. Of course, it’s weird to have no known person around, but it’s not the first time I live alone in a city, and even if I miss my people, London is no far from France.
 
The difference this time, it’s that I’m in a city abroad. And so, everyone talks a different language than me.Across the years, I’ve met a lot of foreign people from all over the world, and most of the time the language we used was English because they were not good at French (my mother tongue), and I can talk only French, English or German (and TALK is a big word). So I have seen different people for who English was not their mother tongue. Also, I’ve seen the difference between them and me. I’ve noticed that France is one of the worst countries in terms of learning a foreign language. Especially English, which is, even so, the worldwide language.When I started to learn English (when I was about 10 years old) I didn’t realize the big deal it is to be able to talk English. I was young and didn’t understand how much English will be important for me to achieve my goals and dreams (in terms of career and personal realizations). Over time, I began to realize this, so I try to improve my English by myself because high school didn’t offer me what I needed. I accepted that French school system will not help me in this task. I look TV shows, listen to radio or TED talks, read magazines or books in English. Plus, when I travel, I have no choice to understand and talk English. And this is the best way for me (and I think in general, for everyone) to learn.Being alone in a foreign country. Being pushed to get by, by yourself.I know I can improve my English, and that’s the main reason which explains I’m today in London, starting since 2 weeks a 5 months course in an English school. Surrounded by English people (or foreign people who are really really good in English). I know I have some (a lot) progress to do.But I’m proud of me because even if you can’t see my progress when you read this SCAB’s and maybe find my English bad, I do know that I already made a lot of progress. That’s good for myself to realize them to encourage me and push me to do better.
 
And I know it’s the beginning.SCA is a school where respect is the most important rule and value. It includes listening others, no judgments, collaboration. This atmosphere is so inspiring and constructive. It really helps me to break this language barrier, open to others and try. Always try, without the fear to fail, especially in front of 50 other people. Because they try to, they fail to. And I do not judge them. Why would they?For now, it’s true that living in a country where no one (almost) talk your language is a bit baffling. But it’s a challenge I decided to take and achieve, to the same extent I decided to take and achieve the challenge SCA represent.

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