1st scab of my inspiration series. By @charlenethblt

Marc lewis | October 16, 2018

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By Charlène Thibault

 

1st scab of my inspiration series.

Punished by Marc, for having forgotten to realize my scab yesterday, I must write a scab every day this week… I don’t think my life is interesting enough to talk about it for 5 days, so I had the idea to share people, things, or stories that inspire me. Here is the first scab of this series…
Van Tame is a painter born in Laos but living in France. He paints on a very large scale with canvases averaging about 4 feet x 3 feet. He uses bright colors and blurred forms which capture the feelings of a place without requiring distinct detail. His touch is visibly closer to impressionists because he does not paint objects, but reflections.  Impressionism is my favorite art movement, which is why I like the fact that it has transcribed this movement to paint scenes of contemporary life. The impressionist movement only wants to transcribe a scene by the colors and the light, which is very adapted to scenes of city and which give an unbelievable depth to his paintings.
Thrift Shop (Bart & BakerRemix) – Postmodern Jukebox (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDlC9m1FDo4)
What I like in this song it’s the mix of eras and musical styles, which are very interesting. Thrift Shop is a song by the american rapper Macklemore and the producer Ryan Lewis. Then the american group Postmodern Jukebox created vintage from this song. And then the French DJs Bart & Baker created an Electro Swing remix. This is mind-blowing. This example is proof that taking inspiration from the work of an artist, to add his personality can really give a breathtaking result.
Marie Marvingt, pioneer.
Born in 1875, and dead 88 years later in 1963, Marie Marvingt holds 17 world records and 33 official medals, making her the most decorated woman in France. From 1899, she became the first woman in France and one of the first in the world, to obtain her driving license (during her life she will obtain 4 other licenses: airship, airplane, seaplane, and helicopter). At that time, she set the record for the highest number of accident-free flights: just over 900. A top-level athlete, she excelled in every conceivable discipline and often far better than her male rivals (cycling, mountaineering, athletics, tennis, skiing, fencing, boxing, etc.). In 1908 she tries to participate in the Tour de France Cycling, but the organizers refuse. She decides to do it anyway by leaving after the other participants. At the end of the round, 36 of the 110 runners, including Marie, cross the finish line. Between all these exploits, Marie finds the time to pass a license of letters, to learn 7 languages ​​and to obtain a diploma of nurse. In 1914, when the First World War broke out, Marie was 39 years old, but that didn’t prevent her from disguising herself as a man for going to the front. After her real identity is discovered, after being fired from the army, and by force of insistence, she gets the right to join the alpine hunters and receives the war cross in 1915 and she becomes the first woman in the world to carried out air combat missions. A true pioneer, she upset all the conventions of her time. She is an example of “if you want, you can », a source of inspiration.